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A communication strategy is the critical piece bridging the situation analysis and the implementation of a social and behavior change communication (SBCC) program. It is a written plan that details how an SBCC program will reach its vision, given the current situation. Effective communication strategies use a systematic process and behavioral theory to design and implement communication activities that encourage sustainable social and behavior change.

Interpersonal communication (IPC) is the tailored exchange or sharing of information, thoughts, ideas and feelings between two or more people to address behavioral determinants of health. It is influenced by attitudes, values, social norms and the individuals’ immediate environment. IPC can be one way or two way. It can also be verbal, non-verbal or both. Types of IPC include one-on-one interactions (at clinic or community), small group interactions, large group discussions, hotlines, supportive supervision visits, peer education, parent-child or inter-spousal communication.

Introduction

Audience segmentation is fundamental to social and behavior change interventions. Segmentation serves to align messages, message delivery channels, products, and services with the needs and preferences of an intended audience to maximize program impact. Segmentation divides a population or market into subgroups that have, or are perceived to have, meaningfully similar characteristics, and significant differences from other subgroups. Audiences may be segmented based on demographic, attributional, psychographic, behavioral, or other key variables. Effective segmentation recognizes that the behavior change problem of interest may vary by segment and that different groups will respond differently to social and behavior change (SBC) approaches.

Service providers play several roles within health systems. Their responsibilities may entail, but often are not limited to, client counseling and care, community mobilization and engagement, and managing supplies and logistics. A provider's ability to perform these tasks effectively may be hindered by barriers within or beyond their immediate sphere of control or influence. A provider’s personal opinions and biases, attitudes and behaviors, capacity and skills, and working conditions may all impact their ability or motivation to deliver quality services. 

This strategy is part of the Rwandan national initiative intending to significantly reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. The program has behavior change at its foundation, and it requires people to adopt the necessary behaviors to achieve malaria pre-elimination. In order to carry out this work, massive community mobilization is required.

Case management of malaria has undergone profound changes over the years since the introduction and widespread use of rapid diagnostic testing (RDT) and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Recent years have seen the evolution of home management of malaria, community-based management of malaria and integrated community case management (iCCM) of malaria packages.

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